Amazon CFO and family charged with insider trading

Amazon’s CFO is charged with insider trading for ‘tipping her husband and stepfather on confidential earnings that earned them $1.4 million over two years’

  • Amazon tax department senior Laksha Bohra was charged with insider trading by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday.
  • Bohra’s husband, Viky Bohra, and stepfather, Gotham Bohra, have also been charged
  • Bohra is accused of acquiring highly confidential information about Amazon’s financial performance ahead of the company’s earnings announcements
  • Viky Bohra and her father Gotham Bohra would then have exchanged this confidential information
  • Authorities say the family made around $1.4 million from their illegal trade in Amazon securities between January 2016 and July 2018.










An Amazon chief financial officer and two members of his family have been charged with insider trading after allegedly cashing in on $1.4 million in illegal trades over a two-year period.

Laksha Bohra, a senior tax department official at Amazon in Seattle, was charged with insider trading by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday.

Bohra’s husband, Viky Bohra, and stepfather Gotham Bohra have also been charged.

The SEC alleges that Bohra prepared and reviewed the calculations that were used to finalize the figures included in Amazon’s quarterly and annual earnings that were filed with the commission.

Laksha Bohra, a senior tax executive at Amazon in Seattle (above), was charged with insider trading by the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday.

Bohra is accused of obtaining highly confidential information about Amazon’s financial performance and then sharing that information with her husband before the company’s earnings announcement between January 2016 and July 2018.

Viky Bohra and her father Gotham Bohra allegedly then exchanged this confidential information, the complaint states.

They are accused of having exchanged confidential information on 11 separate accounts maintained by different members of the Bohra family.

Bohra allegedly ignored quarterly reminders from Amazon that prohibited him from transmitting confidential information or recommend the purchase or sale of Amazon titles.

Authorities say the family made an estimated $1.4 million from their illegal trade in Amazon securities.

Bohra is accused of obtaining highly confidential information about Amazon's financial performance ahead of the company's earnings announcements.  Her husband and stepfather would then have exchanged this information

Bohra is accused of obtaining highly confidential information about Amazon’s financial performance ahead of the company’s earnings announcements. Her husband and stepfather would then have exchanged this information

“We allege the Bohras repeatedly and systematically used Amazon confidential information for their own gain,” said Erin Schneider, SEC Regional Office Director in San Francisco.

“Employees with access to confidential company information that could influence the market cannot use this information to enrich themselves, their friends or their family.”

The SEC complaint, filed Monday in federal court in Seattle, accuses the three Bohras of violating anti-fraud provisions of federal securities laws.

They agreed to pay a total refund of $1,428,094, total prejudgment interest of $118,406 and total penalties of $1,106,399.

It is not known when Bohra stopped working for Amazon or what the circumstances surrounding her departure were.

Amazon would not comment on the SEC complaint.

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